Luxury kitchens style guide

If you're planning on extending or renovating your kitchen, take a look at these design ideas to create your dream space.

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If you’re planning on extending or renovating your kitchen, take a look at these design ideas to create your dream space.

Painted wood and solid walnut Vermont kitchen from Underwood

Modern country

Kitchen designed by Roundhouse

Kitchen from the Broadoak range by Second Nature

Kitchen from the John Lewis painted Kensington range

Handcrafted Shaker style kitchen from the English Revival Modern Classic collection by Mereway Kitchens

High gloss walnut kitchen by Neil Lerner Kitchens

Tetbury Lichen kitchen by Laura Ashley

Zeluso kitchen by Crown Imperial

Kitchen trends to look out for

Lighting: Many homeowners are now using an independent lighting consultant when designing their kitchen. They can advise you on choosing a definitive, flexible and energy-efficient system.

Materials: ‘Manmade materials are now trending in leading-edge kitchens,’ says Keith Atkins, director of design at DesignSpaceLondon (designspacelondon.com). ‘Modulnova’s new Twenty Cemento kitchen is inspired by new resin technology, which allows the cabinets to be wrapped in a 3mm liquid cement coating that is silky smooth and cool to the touch but visually warm in its natural stone tones. Kerlite is another remarkable new material: heatproof, acid-proof and mechanically strong, this nonporous porcelain can be used as thin as 3mm. This allows it to be used to clad work surfaces, door fronts, splashbacks and walls, creating sculptural shapes that flow seamlessly together. These manmade materials come in a dazzling spectrum of colours, textures and finishes.’

Glazing: Glass box extensions, skylights and bi-fold doors introduce plenty of natural light to a kitchen. Open-plan living that leads through to the garden with flush-level flooring continues to be a key trend.

Colour: ‘The current trend is for calm, neutral colours mixed with blue-grey tones, with flashes of colour used for accent pieces, such as pink or ruby red used for small details and highlights,’ says Richard Moore, design director at Martin Moore & Company (martinmoore.com).