How to make a room look bigger? Marie Kondo has the answer

Organizing guru Marie Kondo knows how to make a room look bigger. Here are the top tricks

make a room look bigger with mirrors john lewis and partners
(Image credit: John Lewis & Partners)

Hands up if you’d like more space in your home? There are plenty of us who answer yes to that question. If you’re not in a position to move to a bigger house or apartment, nor extend to get more square footage, though, all is definitely not lost.

Sometimes, creating the illusion of extra space is all that’s needed to transform a room, taking it from cramped-feeling to light, bright and airy. Like the idea? Queen of organizing Marie Kondo knows how, and showed how to make a room look bigger on Insta.

Check out this neat trick below (clue: it involves a mirror), and take a look at the other great ways you can use mirrors to make a room look bigger than it really is by scrolling down. And if you‘re struggling with a compact space, our small living room ideas will make yours super stylish.

How to make a room look bigger with mirrors

1. As Marie Kondo showed, a super-sized floor-standing mirror can work wonders. Creating a huge reflection, one of these can make it appear as if there’s another room beyond the one you are standing in to space-stretching effect. 

Sometimes called leaner mirrors, these come in a range of styles, so you can pick a frame that’s as lavishly ornate or contemporary and sleek as you like. We like the way this design adds decorative detail to an otherwise unfussy rustic scheme, which helps amplify its attention-grabbing presence.

2. If you want to visually alter your room so it looks wider, use a long mirror horizontally. This is a top solution for a narrow hallway, but it also works in a kitchen in the form of a mirrored splashback.

3. Mirrors make a room look bigger not only because they create interesting reflections but also by way of multiplying the light that comes into the space so you’re not left with gloomy corners. Try hanging a group rather than one to brighten up a room; it can be a more budget-friendly way to shop, and  you’ll get different snapshots of the room from each.

4. Does your dining table leave some guests staring straight at a wall? Hang a generous mirror in their eye line instead to capture a vista of the rest of the room or, if there’s a window on the facing wall, a view outside. With a larger internal or even external outlook, the room will feel bigger.

5. If your room has a chimney breast with alcoves either side, don’t just opt for a mirror above the mantelpiece. Hanging mirrored glass or tiles in the alcoves will make the room feel deeper and larger. 

6. Hanging a mirror that looks like a window on a wall that doesn’t have one can give the illusion of a panorama that tricks the eye into seeing a room as larger. To pull off this trick, opt for a mirror with glass divided into separate panes. You can go for industrial-style metal framing, more rustic, or period-style versions.

7. If mirrored wardrobe doors make you think of dated designs that are hard to move along their tracks, think again. The latest designs look chic, open smoothly and, best of all, will make a tiny bedroom feel much larger.

Sarah Warwick
Sarah Warwick

Sarah is a freelance journalist and editor writing for websites, national newspapers, and magazines. She’s spent most of her journalistic career specialising in homes – long enough to see fridges become smart, decorating fashions embrace both minimalism and maximalism, and interiors that blur the indoor/outdoor link become a must-have. She loves testing the latest home appliances, revealing the trends in furnishings and fittings for every room, and investigating the benefits, costs and practicalities of home improvement. It's no big surprise that she likes to put what she writes about into practice, and is a serial house revamper. For Realhomes.com, Sarah reviews coffee machines and vacuum cleaners, taking them through their paces at home to give us an honest, real life review and comparison of every model.