How to make gravy

Delicious gravy to accompany your roast in a matter of minutes (and, no, it’s not made with granules)

gravy
(Image credit: Getty)

Want to know how to make gravy? There’s no need to resort to store-bought granules to make the gravy that’s an essential with your roast. Instead use the juices from the joint you’ve roasted to make a delicious gravy. Even better, there’s no extra washing up with this method.

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How to make gravy

(Image credit: Getty)

Forewarning: you will need to cook the meat in a roasting pan you can use on the hob, or transfer the juices to a pan.

1. To make the gravy, take the joint out of the pan, and set it aside to rest. 

2. Spoon off most of the fat from the pan, leaving around a tablespoon. 

3. Over a high heat, scrape the tin to incorporate the flavours of the bits left behind, and add 450ml stock. Bring to the boil, then turn the heat down to a simmer, stirring regularly, and reduce the volume of the mixture. It should only take about 10 minutes to get to around half of what it was, and you’re done. 

Season to taste.

How to make gravy like Gordon Ramsay does

You will need to cook the meat in a roasting pan you can use on the hob, or transfer the juices to a pan. If space is tight on the hob, it's fine to use a pan and transfer the juices over – this will save you space, but you'll need a good plastic spatula to scrape the pan with.

1. To make the gravy, take the joint out of the pan, and set it aside to rest. 

2. Spoon off most of the fat from the pan, leaving around a tablespoon – or transfer it all into a jug and spoon off the fat from there. 

3. Over a high heat, scrape the tin to incorporate the flavours of the bits left behind; here, we like to add 450ml stock. Gordon Ramsay's rich gravy recipe uses 200ml of red wine or port. 

4. Bring to the boil, then add three tablespoons of plain flour (more if you want a thicker gravy), stirring constantly. 

5. Now add back in all the cooking juices you drained off earlier and season. Turn the heat down to a simmer, stirring regularly, and reduce the volume of the mixture. It should only take about 10 minutes to get to around half of what it was, and you’re done. 

6. Want to add a final flourish? Gordon Ramsay adds a pinch of paprika here to enrich the flavour, plus some finely chopped herbs (he recommends rosemary and thyme).

How to thicken gravy: make a roux

By far the best way to thicken gravy is to make a roux at the beginning of making it. It's very simple: just melt a generous wedge of butter in a saucepan over medium heat, then add a couple of tablespoon of flour. Then, pour in your gravy ingredients. Voila, your gravy will be thick and saucy.

How to thicken gravy with plain flour

If you've forgotten to make a roux, don't worry: there's still time to rescue your gravy. Mix a couple of tablespoons of flour with about the same amount of water, then gradually pour it into the gravy, stirring vigorously. Stop as soon as the gravy is thick enough. 

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