These are the things you shouldn't put on a fire pit, according to experts

An outdoor fire is a lovely garden design feature - but there are things you shouldn't put on a fire pit

fire pit
(Image credit: Moda Furnishings)

A crackling fire pit gives any outdoor living space a more cosy feel as the temperature drops come evening. However, there are some things you shouldn't put on a fire pit, as much as we love them as a statement garden design idea.

The longer days are finally here, and the warmth of a fire in your garden or courtyard will mean evenings don't have to be cut short as soon as it gets chilly. Read on to ensure you're using your fire pit safely.

fire pit

(Image credit: WoodBlocX)

Things you shouldn't put on a fire pit

According to Catherine Moss from Indian Fire Bowl Company, there are lots of things we shouldn't burn on our fire pits. 'Paper, cardboard, softwood and general greenery can produce a lot of smoke and ash when on fire,' she says. 'If not managed, the ash residue can quickly spread around your garden and potentially set alight shrubbery. 

'We’d recommend recycling these items instead to avoid any issues,' Catherine explains. She adds that food waste and garden clippings could trigger allergic reactions when burnt, so it's best to throw them in the trash.

fire pit

(Image credit: WoodBlocX)

The subject of whether we should have fire pits in our gardens at all was discussed on Radio 4 program World at One this week. Sharon George, a senior lecturer in environmental science at Keele University pointed out that particulates in the air from fires can be harmful to our health.

'If you're burning wet wood and mass from around your garden, it's going to produce more smoke,' Sharon says, 'and it's those tiny little smoke particles that are particularly bad for us.' Therefore it's probably not a good idea to throw on any garden waste left over from pruning and planting we're doing in the garden this spring.

fire pit

(Image credit: Moda Furnishings)

A fire pit idea will elevate any outdoor area and creates an atmospheric, relaxing and sociable space. Just remember to avoid burning paper, cardboard, damp wood, and garden waste.

Millie Hurst

Millie is a homes writer renting in North London. She loves vintage furniture, candles, Interior Design Masters and a Facebook Marketplace bargain. She has previously written for Fabulous, Stylist and Marie Claire.

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