Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle review: the polka dot kettle that's perfect for spring

The Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle is a quiet and large capacity option that's perfectly suited to family homes. Our small appliance editor put it to the test in this review

Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle review
(Image credit: Russell Hobbs)
Real Homes Verdict

The Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle is lovely to look at and great to use. Its price and functions hit the right mark for most households, and it comes in a charming polka dot or heart print (with the option of a matching toaster)

Reasons to buy
  • +

    Lovely to pour

  • +

    Ergonomic handle

  • +

    Very quiet

  • +

    The print is lovely

  • +

    Lightweight but high quality

  • +

    "On" light included

  • +

    Flat 360 base

Reasons to avoid
  • -

    The look won't be for everyone

  • -

    It's not the cheapest kettle you can buy

Oft-overlooked when it comes to kitchen essentials, the best kettles are certainly simple and rarely smart, but they make life a whole lot easier. A kettle is not a purchase I take lightly, so in this Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle review I put it to the test in my own kitchen for months to reach my verdict.

I've yet to meet anyone who uses their kettle quite as much as me. I work from home and drink a lot of tea, from my morning builder's brew (milk, no sugar, please) to a calming peppermint before I hit the sack. I also use my kettle to boil my water for cooking rice, pasta, broccoli, you name it. It's the hardest working appliance in my home. 

Of all the kettles I've reviewed, the polka dot Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle is the one that got to stay in my kitchen, so you might say it's my favourite. It wasn't the most expensive or flashy kettle I reviewed by any means, but it looks lovely and (most importantly) it's very quiet. If you want a seasonal springtime kettle, keep reading for my full Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle review. 

Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle review: specs

best kettle

(Image credit: Russell Hobbs)
  • Size: 23.3 x 23.3 x 29.7 cm
  • Capacity: 1.7 litres
  • Power: 3000 watts
  • Weight: 1.8kg
  • Features: Dry boil protection, quiet boil, 360° base, removable limescale filter

Using the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle

Assuming you've used a kettle before, the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle won't have any surprises in store. You plug it in, fill the kettle, switch it on, and pour when it's boiled. Simple! 

There are a few quirks worth mentioning though. For a start, the kettle is pyramid shape and the spout is angled. This makes pouring a breeze - it's smooth and flows nicely. 

The internal limescale filter slots onto the inside of the spout, and can easily be pulled out and cleaned. The exterior of the kettle has a measurement in cups, with markings of four and six cup measurements.

It's a shame that the exterior of the kettle doesn't show markings for one or two cups because it could make boiling smaller quantities tricky, but the interior does mark this with red indicators, so you can always check that this levels out when filling the kettle. 

Russell Hobbs 21889

(Image credit: Russell Hobbs)

You switch the kettle on by placing it on the 360-degree flat base and pressing down the lever. A small light on the side of the kettle then turns red, indicating it's in the process of boiling. It automatically switches off when this is done, and the light turns off with it. 

Pouring is easy thanks to the overarching handle, which is plastic and retro-looking but very ergonomic to hold. As I said, pouring is very enjoyable with the Russell Hobbs 21889 kettle. 

What I like about the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle

I tried out the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle in polka dot, but if it weren't for the fact that I share a kitchen with my partner I'd have definitely opted for the pink heart option, which is just as lovely. 

Because both the polka dot and heart print are iconic Emma Bridgewater designs, there are plenty of mugs, plates and other kitchenware options to pair with the kettle itself. This makes for a coordinated kitchen, and for those who already have parts of the Emma Bridgewater kitchenware range, it's a no-brainer. 

Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle

(Image credit: Russell Hobbs)

You can also pair the kettle with either two-slice or four-slice toasters. I've also tried the toaster, and while I don't love the look quite as much, it functions well and has wide slots for toast. Alternatively, because of the multi-coloured polka dot design, it would be easy to pair the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle with one of the best toasters in our guide. 

Looks aside, my favourite part of the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle is its quiet function. Russell Hobbs says that this kettle is 70% quieter than its other kettles, and I can believe it. I've been working from home and sharing the kitchen table with my partner for months, and a loud kettle can really get in the way of zoom calls or simply become irritating. 

A quiet kettle was top of my list for important features, so if you're in a similar position I couldn't recommend this kettle more. It's the quietest of the kettles I've tried and if it weren't for the click that indicates it's done boiling I could easily forget it's been on. 

What I don't like about the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle

Given my five star rating, it's clear that there's not much I don't like about the What I like about the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle. That said, it's not right for everyone.

Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle

(Image credit: Russell Hobbs)

For a start, you do pay for the look of this kettle. It's not the most expensive kettle on the market but it's also not the cheapest you can buy, so if price is a concern then there are others out there. One example of this is the Russell Hobbs Legacy Kettle. It lacks the pretty exterior, but under the hood, it's the exact same kettle with the quiet boil functions and pyramid design. It's also a fair bit cheaper, which illustrates the cost of the Emma Bridgewater name. 

My second complaint is the lid. Some kettles come with a button that lifts the lid with a lever, meaning you won't have to open it with a handle and risk scorching your hand with hot steam when the kettle has just boiled. It's a small issue that's easily solved by just not refilling the kettle when it's just finished boiling, but some other kettles including the Bosch Sky Kettle come with the safety lever included. 

Should you buy the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle?

If you want a bright and cheery kettle for spring, look no further. The Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle is my top pick. It's quiet, nice to look at and a delight to pour. 

This is also a mid-price option that will be within budget for a lot of families, and the 1.7 litre capacity is generous enough to serve over six cups of tea in one go. 

As with many pyramid-shaped kettles there's no external marker of the measurement for one or two cups. This is marked internally though, so it's only mildly inconvenient. 

About this review, and the reviewer

Millie Fender is an editor at Real Homes, specializing in small appliances and all things cooking. She loves putting new products to the test, whether they're air fryers, blenders, or even pizza ovens, and her family and friends love eating the results. 

Millie has a constant stream of new products waiting to be reviewed in her kitchen. It's a little snug, so if she thinks anything deserves to stay there, you know it's something special. 

She reviewed the Russell Hobbs Emma Bridgewater kettle from her own home for two months, using it to make copious amounts of tea and coffee, as well as to cook pasta and even fill her hot water bottle. 

Millie Fender
Millie Fender

Millie joined the Real Homes team in 2021 after working at TopTenReviews as a Staff Writer. She is now the head of all things cookware, working as the Small Appliances and Cooking Editor on the Homes Ecommerce team. Millie is constantly on the hunt for the latest (and best) kitchen appliances, and reviewing these products hands-on. As a baking enthusiast, Millie’s job at Real Homes is the perfect excuse to cook up an endless supply of snacks. When she’s not in the kitchen though, she loves knitting and exploring London's top food markets.