How to replace damaged wall or floor tiles

Follow this practical step-by-step guide from the Haynes Decorating Manual of how to remove broken or cracked tiles without having to replace your entire floor or splashback of tiles.

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Follow this practical step-by-step guide from the Haynes Decorating Manual of how to remove broken or cracked tiles without having to replace your entire floor or splashback of tiles.

Step one: The first job is to take out the grout completely on all four sides of the tile.

Step two: Drill a series of holes around the centre of the tile, using a ceramic tile bit and an electric drill. Since the tile is being removed, even a masonry bit can be used without tape, as if it slips slightly it will not matter.

Step three: Use a hammer and cold chisel to cut through the tile. Wear gloves to protect your hands and goggles to shield your eyes from flying fragments, which can be sharp.

Step four: Work towards the edges of the tile, gently breaking pieces away. Be very careful when you get close to the neighbouring tiles. With the tile removed, chisel out as much adhesive as possible; when you insert a dry tile it must not stand proud.

Step five: Then coat the back of the new riles with adhesive and set it in place. Use a wooden batten to ensure that it is flush with the adjacent tiles and fit the tile spacers to ensure uniform grout joints. Grout the tile in the usual manner.

Ideal tool for the job

A ceramic tile drill is designed to bite immediately into the glaze of a tile without skidding, removing the need for masking tape or breaking through the glaze with a sharp pointed tool, various sizes are available to suit a range of hole diameters.

Taken from Haynes Home Decorating Manual: The DIY manual for painting, wallpapering and tiling (JH Haynes and Co Ltd, £19.99)