The best 65-inch TVs 2018

At this size, mistakes can be costly, so avoid all doubt with our guide to the best 65-inch TVs

TODO alt text

If you are looking to buy a new premium TV, then 65-inches is undoubtedly where you have the most choice. Here's where most TV flagships sit, proudly showing off the best tech that each of the manufacturers have to offer. 

While this means that there are a lot of horrendously pricey TVs available at this size, there are also a few budget sets available. We'd advise against opting for the truly supermarket-level bargains, but there are plenty of compromises you can make to bring the price of your set down. 

The single biggest decision you'll have to make is between buying a conventional LCD TV (also occasionally referred to as LED TVs) and an OLED TV

OLED TVs are more expensive, but they benefit from absolutely astonishing levels of contrast thanks to the fact that they're able to turn off individual pixels to create 'perfect' black levels.

That said, they can't quite get as bright as LCD TVs meaning they can be a little harder to watch in bright living rooms. You also don't get quite as much sparkle in brighter parts of an image. 

Beyond panel type your decision will come down to the strengths and weaknesses of each TV in particular, and we'll get into each of these as we dive into our guide to the best 65-inch TVs of 2018. 

1. LG OLED65B7

LG's budget OLED is a fantastic buy

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: WebOS
HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision
Reasons to buy
+'Perfect' blacks+Responsive panel+Cheapest of LG's OLEDs
Reasons to avoid
-Be prepared to buy an external soundbar

Although 2017 saw a whole host of different manufacturers start embracing OLED technology, few of them have gone as far as LG, which has a total of five OLED models on sale currently. The B7 is the cheapest of the lot, and we think that makes it a fantastic buy. 

Obviously this choice is great, but better still is the fact that you don't have to compromise on picture quality if you want to save yourself some money. Each of the TVs come equipped with exactly the same panel and picture processing technology, which by all accounts is absolutely superb and has phenomenally low levels of input lag to boot. 

The compromise comes from the audio side of the equation. LG's more expensive sets come equipped with front-firing Atmos-capable speakers, while the B7 has to instead make do with a pair of fairly week downward-firing speakers. 

The result is that it doesn't sound that great, but frankly with the amount of money you save by opting for the B7 over its more expensive brothers you can afford to buy a decent soundbar to pair it with. 

2. Sony KD-65XE9005

A fantastic LCD alternative

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Android TV
HDR: HDR10
Reasons to buy
+Accomplished backlight is great for HDR+Decent audio abilities
Reasons to avoid
-HDR could be brighter

If you're not on board with the amount of money you'd have to spend on an OLED, then there are still a good number of LCD TVs worth considering. 

Our pick of the bunch is Sony's XE90. Unlike an OLED it's unable to turn its light off on a pixel-by-pixel basis, so in order to create contrast between light and dark parts of an image it instead uses an LED backlight. This backlight is able to turn off behind certain parts of the image to allow for variation in brightness levels. 

The resulting HDR images speak for themselves, and mean that you'll be able to enjoy the benefits of LCD over OLEDs, namely much higher peak brightness levels. 

Further up Sony's LCD lineup you can get much brighter TVs, but we think the XE90 sits at a great intersection of price and performance, making it the second best 65 inch TV you can buy today. 

3. Sony KD-65A1

A high-end OLED with some impressive upscaling smarts

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: Android TV
HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision (incoming via firmware update)
Reasons to buy
+Impressive upscaling+Sounds great
Reasons to avoid
-Expensive-Unusual stand

If you want an OLED and you have the budget to spend, then Sony's 65-inch A1 OLED is an absolutely great buy. 

It's big advantage over LG's B7 is how it's able to upscale HD/SDR content to a level that looks almost identical to native 4K/HDR footage. That's a great piece of functionality, especially when you consider that the majority of content is unlikely to be 4K HDR for the foreseeable future. 

Beyond its upscaling prowess the set also features a pretty unique speaker configuration which actually sees it vibrate its screen itself to create sound. 

The downside of these expanded functionalities is twofold. First off, the A1 isn't as great a choice for gaming as the B7 as it has higher levels of input lag, and secondly its price premium is pretty severe, even for an OLED. 

But if your pockets are deep enough this is still a fantastic buy. 

4. Sony KD-65XE8596

A great bargain

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Android TV
HDR: HDR10
Reasons to buy
+Decent value+Accomplished HDR and SDR
Reasons to avoid
-HDR a little dim-Android TV can frustrate

Lower down the Sony range you have the XE85, which is where things start to get a little more affordable. 

The XE85's compromises over the XE90 are numerous, but at this price they're not overwhelmingly concerning. While the XE90 is equipped with the top of the line X1 Extreme processing chip, the XE85 has the step-down X1 (non-Extreme) chip. In practise this means that while it still does a decent job at upscaling HD to Ultra HD, it's not quite at the same level as the XE90. 

It's a similar story when it comes to motion handling and HDR. It's never unacceptably bad, but if you spend more then you can expect to get more performance. 

Other than these reservations, the 65-inch XE85 is a fantastic budget buy. 

5. LG 65UJ634V

An LCD TV with the delights of WebOS

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: WebOS
HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision
Reasons to buy
+Dolby Vision support+Great smart interface
Reasons to avoid
-Audio could be better

Although LG's TV lineup has been defined by its OLED offerings for many years now, its LCD TVs aren't half bad either. 

The 65UJ634V's blacks might not be as deep as what's possible on its OLED siblings, but its IPS panel offers lovely wide viewing angles with bright and vivid colours. 

More importantly, the TVs interface is top notch. The smart OS is WebOS, which we count as one of the most easy to use TV operating systems out there, and the TV also comes packing Freeview Play, which allows access to catch-up services from within the TV guide. 

You won't get the best picture quality around, but if you're more concerned about having a TV that's easy to navigate and use then the LG 65UJ634V should be top of your list. 

6. Hisense H65N5300

A cheap TV without compromise

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Vidaa Lite
HDR: No
Reasons to buy
+Cheap+Smart platform is capable
Reasons to avoid
-No HDR

While you certainly can get a 65-inch TV for pennies in this day and age, at a certain point you're better off spending the same amount of money on a smaller and much more capable set. 

The Hisense H65N5300 is probably the cheapest set we'd recommend getting if you absolutely must have a 65-inch TV. 

It's got a decent enough smart operating system with access to plenty of streaming apps, and Freeview Play means that accessing the all important catch-up services is beautifully simple. 

The big downside here is that while the set is 4K it doesn't offer HDR which we'd consider to be equally as important, if not more so. This severely limits the picture quality that the set is able to achieve. 

Nevertheless, if 65-inches at 4K is your priority, then the Hisense H65N5300 is a very functional television. 

7. LG OLED65W7

An utterly stunningly designed TV

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: OLED
Smart TV: WebOS
HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision
Reasons to buy
+Wallpaper thin design+Dolby Atmos soundbar
Reasons to avoid
-Can only be wall-mounted

At the opposite end of LG's OLED lineup from the B7 sits the W7. It's the kind of TV you buy if you win the lottery, to go along with your sleek new mansion and shiny new Tesla and trust us, it looks absolutely gorgeous. 

We're constantly told how thin OLED TVs are able to be, but the fact is that because they need to make space for all their internal circuitry and ports there's a limit on how thin they can be. 

The W7 is different because it outsources all its internals to an external soundbar. The OLED panel hangs on a wall where it's just a couple of millimetres thick, while the soundbar sits below it and handles all the picture processing and audio duties. 

It's a stunning form-factor, but the fact that it relies entirely on wall-mounting means that the TV won't be for everyone. 

Its picture quality is exactly the same as the B7's, but the big functional change is the sound, which features upward-firing speakers to offer a full Dolby Atmos experience. It's impressive in all the ways you'd hope it would be. 

The TV's price will place it out of reach of all but the most committed of AV enthusiasts, but if you want a set that's just impressive to look at when it's off as when it's on, then the LG OLED W7 is the TV for you. 

8. Sony KD-65ZD9

The best HDR LCD has to offer

Specifications
Resolution: Ultra HD
Panel type: LCD
Smart TV: Android TV
HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision (incoming via firmware update)
Reasons to buy
+Stunning HDR+Phenomenally bright
Reasons to avoid
-Hugely expensive-Average audio

If you want a premium TV experience but don't want to go for OLED, then Sony ZD9 is the set to go for. 

This TV uses a similar form of backlighting technology as Sony uses on its other LCD models, but it pushes it to the extreme with more backlighting zones (meaning more precise contrast between light and dark areas of an image) and a much brighter panel (meaning more striking HDR highlights and more detail in the bright parts of an image). 

You'll pay dearly for the privilege of course (hence why this TV is sitting so far down our list), but the Sony KD-65ZD9 makes LCD's strongest argument yet against OLED.

Want more expert home tech advice?